Anna. 22. Canadian. A child of the universe. In the process of learning and strengthening the bonds of sisterhood in the world. Seek justice, truth and peace.

 

okmoonkid:

happy earth day everyone

i hope u can take this time to pause and think about the world around you and how being alive at this very moment has enabled you to see a world that is still good

this is an exciting time we live in and an exciting earth we live on, we should celebrate its existence and our existence upon it

Anonymous asked
Penises are for urinating and supplying sperm for reproduction, doesn't mean we urinate and fuck in public .. why should breast feeding be okay? fucking typical one sided feminist

sktagg23:

Does your penis provide sustenance for another person? No. Can you show your nipples in public if you want to? Yes. Also, breasts are not genitals or sex organs. Only 13 out of 190 cultures world wide consider them to be sexual or even private parts. Don’t even act like this is a feminist thing. This is a babies-have-the-right-to-eat thing.

image

america-wakiewakie:

World Bank Wants Water Privatized, Despite Risk | Al Jazeera
Humans can survive weeks without food, but only days without water — in some conditions, only hours. It may sound clichéd, but it’s no hyperbole: Water is life. So what happens when private companies control the spigot? Evidence from water privatization projects around the world paints a pretty clear picture — public health is at stake.
In the run-up to its annual spring meeting this month, the World Bank Group, which offers loans, advice and other resources to developing countries, held four days of dialogues in Washington, D.C. Civil society groups from around the world and World Bank Group staff convened to discuss many topics. Water was high on the list.
It’s hard to think of a more important topic. We face a global water crisis, made worse by the warming temperatures of climate change. A quarter of the world’s people don’t have sufficient access to clean drinking water, and more people die every year from waterborne illnesses — such as cholera and typhoid fever — than from all forms of violence, including war, combined. Every hour, the United Nations estimates, 240 babies die from unsafe water.
The World Bank Group pushes privatization as a key solution to the water crisis. It is the largest funder of water management in the developing world, with loans and financing channeled through the group’s International Finance Corporation (IFC). Since the 1980s, the IFC has been promoting these water projects as part of a broader set of privatization policies, with loans and financing tied to enacting austerity measures designed to shrink the state, from the telecom industry to water utilities.
But international advocacy and civil society groups point to the pockmarked record of private-sector water projects and are calling on the World Bank Group to end support for private water.
In the decades since the IFC’s initial push, we have seen the results of water privatization: It doesn’t work. Water is not like telecommunications or transportation. You could tolerate crappy phone service, but have faulty pipes connecting to your municipal water and you’re in real trouble. Water is exceptional.
(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: ZME Science)

america-wakiewakie:

World Bank Wants Water Privatized, Despite Risk | Al Jazeera

Humans can survive weeks without food, but only days without water — in some conditions, only hours. It may sound clichéd, but it’s no hyperbole: Water is life. So what happens when private companies control the spigot? Evidence from water privatization projects around the world paints a pretty clear picture — public health is at stake.

In the run-up to its annual spring meeting this month, the World Bank Group, which offers loans, advice and other resources to developing countries, held four days of dialogues in Washington, D.C. Civil society groups from around the world and World Bank Group staff convened to discuss many topics. Water was high on the list.

It’s hard to think of a more important topic. We face a global water crisis, made worse by the warming temperatures of climate change. A quarter of the world’s people don’t have sufficient access to clean drinking water, and more people die every year from waterborne illnesses — such as cholera and typhoid fever — than from all forms of violence, including war, combined. Every hour, the United Nations estimates, 240 babies die from unsafe water.

The World Bank Group pushes privatization as a key solution to the water crisis. It is the largest funder of water management in the developing world, with loans and financing channeled through the group’s International Finance Corporation (IFC). Since the 1980s, the IFC has been promoting these water projects as part of a broader set of privatization policies, with loans and financing tied to enacting austerity measures designed to shrink the state, from the telecom industry to water utilities.

But international advocacy and civil society groups point to the pockmarked record of private-sector water projects and are calling on the World Bank Group to end support for private water.

In the decades since the IFC’s initial push, we have seen the results of water privatization: It doesn’t work. Water is not like telecommunications or transportation. You could tolerate crappy phone service, but have faulty pipes connecting to your municipal water and you’re in real trouble. Water is exceptional.

(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: ZME Science)

And sometimes I have kept my feelings to myself, because I could find no language to describe them in.

Jane Austen, from Sense and Sensibility (Penguin Classics, 2003)

Canada's Middle Class Is Now the World’s Richest   

bethelionqueen:

oh-snap-pro-choice:

betterthandarkchocolate:

thelipstickontherim:

Bring socks!!!! #homeless #donate #homelessness

As are toiletries!

I would also advice NOT to buy wool socks because yes, they are warm, but wool shrinks very easily, some people are allergic to wool, and wet wool is one of the most uncomfortable things in the world.
Thick cotton socks would be best, they’d last the longest and be the easiest to take care of and clean.
- Jane

Cotton is best. Always cotton

bethelionqueen:

oh-snap-pro-choice:

betterthandarkchocolate:

thelipstickontherim:

Bring socks!!!! #homeless #donate #homelessness

As are toiletries!

I would also advice NOT to buy wool socks because yes, they are warm, but wool shrinks very easily, some people are allergic to wool, and wet wool is one of the most uncomfortable things in the world.

Thick cotton socks would be best, they’d last the longest and be the easiest to take care of and clean.

- Jane

Cotton is best. Always cotton

victoriousvocabulary:

VIAGGIARE
[verb]
to travel; to move from one place to another.
Etymology: Latin.
[Justin Gerard]

victoriousvocabulary:

VIAGGIARE

[verb]

to travel; to move from one place to another.

Etymology: Latin.

[Justin Gerard]